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Man Rescues Rack of Ribs From an Apartment Complex Fire

Man Rescues Rack of Ribs From an Apartment Complex Fire


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His first priority was his family, but he was genuinely concerned about the ribs he was barbecuing

Robert Wright holds up his unharmed rack of ribs.

A fire broke out at an apartment complex in Fresno, California, September 2 at 3 a.m., and this man made sure to save not only his kids, but also a rack of ribs.

Robert Wright, a resident of the apartment complex, was barbecuing next door when the incident occurred. He told local FOX affiliate KMPH that he saw the fire blow out a window in the complex, so naturally his first reaction was to save his family in the apartment — and his ribs.

“I got my kids first and then I thought about my ribs, and I didn’t want to let my ribs burn, because I take pride in what I do, man,” Wright told KMPH. “It’s like 3 in the morning and I was hungry, I was like, ‘put some ribs on there, man.’”

Wright held up the ribs to the camera and said that the situation was “frantic” and “serious,” adding, “I’m going to enjoy this barbecue — have a good night, man. Hope they put us in a motel because they owe us for that one…”


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Recipe for 'Brontosaurus Bones' (beef baby back ribs)

Beef ribs are all the rage in the barbecue world these days.

I first saw beef ribs 20 years ago in Nassau, Bahamas. Looking for the best local food, I asked a taxi driver to take me to his favorite restaurant. He took me to a barbecue shack way off the tourist path and introduced me to the finest plate of beef ribs that &mdash up to that time &mdash I had ever eaten.

Not only were they the tastiest, but they were the biggest ribs that I had ever seen. He aptly called them &ldquoBrontosaurus Bones&rdquo because of their dinosaur size, and it stuck with me. The Bahamas&rsquo road-side barbecue shack served the meaty-style, sometimes called &ldquoHollywood,&rdquo beef back ribs. The ribs come from the same place on a cow as the well-known pork baby back ribs.

Today, the meatier short rib is the &ldquoTexas&rdquo beef rib of choice. This rib was made popular by Wayne Mueller of Taylor, Texas, and perfected in New York by Billy Durney of Hometown Bar-B-Que in Red Hook, a Brooklyn neighborhood in New York, who learned from Mueller.

Durney took the ethnic foods of his Brooklyn upbringing and re-made them using southern barbecue techniques. Think pastrami-cured pork belly, jerk ribs, and a smoked lamb belly Vietnamese banh mi sandwich. The beef rib that he is famous for is his interpretation of what he ate during his first visit to Mueller&rsquos restaurant.

In a recent conversation, Durney told me that when Mueller started smoking short ribs, they weren&rsquot used in restaurants for any other preparation than braising, and they were relatively cheap. These days, they have become so popular that they are very expensive and barbecue restaurants often lose money serving them. Durney buys 123-A beef-plate short ribs in three-bone racks from his butcher. If you have a good butcher, you can request that cut. Each bone-in short rib can be cut into 6-8 pieces, which will serve 2-3 people, and will weigh around 1.3 pounds once it is cooked.

When I asked Durney why he thought that he was known for beef ribs, he modestly said that he figured out when to pull the ribs from the pit and how to rest them to maximize their tenderness and flavor. He very generously shared his secrets with me and you.

No. 1, you have to &ldquofeel&rdquo the ribs to know that they are done. They are ready to come off the heat once the bones have receded from the meat. &ldquoThe center is soft and tender to the touch and the top of the meat should also be wet and glistening because the fat and collagen from the beef has rendered,&rdquo explained Durney. &ldquoIf the beef ribs are dry and crusty, you have overcooked them.&rdquo

And, they have to rest a good long while &mdash 40-60 minutes on a rack set into a sheet pan so the air can circulate around the meat. &ldquoIf you set the ribs on the surface of the pan, they will steam and continue cooking,&rdquo he warned. After the initial rest, &ldquowrap them tightly with a layer of plastic wrap and a layer of butcher paper,&rdquo continued Durney.


Watch the video: Man Grills Ribs u0026 Saves People From Fire (May 2022).