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Morris Yachts: Building the World's Best Luxury Sailboats on the Coast of Maine

Morris Yachts: Building the World's Best Luxury Sailboats on the Coast of Maine


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“Superyacht is a frame of mind, not a measurement.” Though Maine’s Cuyler Morris doesn't build the world’s largest sailboats, many would say he builds the best. Morris Yachts are known the world over for their exclusive, exquisitely crafted sailing yachts, “the Stradivarius of the seas.” The family-owned firm, founded in 1972, does not aim to become a megabrand, but their reputation for luxury, performance and unparalleled quality stands as the envy of many larger marques. The business is flourishing, with a new sales office recently opened in Newport, Rhode Island.

On a recent excursion to Mount Desert Island, Maine, we toured the Morris boatyard and went sailing with Mr. Morris aboard one of the company’s beautiful hand-built yachts, experiencing the pleasures and privileges of a Morris owner for the space of an afternoon. The trip took us past some of the East Coast’s most exclusive real estate and summer retreats of some of the wealthiest families in America, a suitable setting for a sail on such an exclusive craft. And while a Morris yacht turns heads in any harbor, like the estates on MDI, they are made first and foremost for the private enjoyment of the owner.

Morris’ main business is building semi-custom sailing yachts from 29 to 80 feet . Their newest creation, the M46, is a sleek 46 footer priced from $1.1M, which puts it at the very top of the market for yachts of that size. Morris customers know they’re getting their money’s worth by buying a boat that is built to last a lifetime, with every single detail constructed to exacting specifications. You don't even need to be an expert sailor, since the boats are designed to be easily sailed by a single person so that owners can make the most of their time on the water — even beginners can quickly master their controls.

Both of Morris’ signature lines, the elegant M-Series and sporty Ocean Series, have set benchmarks for excellence among discerning yachting enthusiasts. Over the years, the brand has worked with world-renowned yacht designers Sparkman & Stephens, C. W. Paine and David Pedrick. For our afternoon of sailing Mr. Morris took us out on an M36, a stylish 36-foot “daysailer” priced from $419,000 that epitomizes everything the brand has to offer. When the model made its debut in 2004, Yachting magazine noted, “The attention to detail and quality of workmanship is dazzling.”

At the time the M36 was the only daysailer on the market to feature a self-tacking jib, sail handling systems and helm control pods, and essential — though extremely expensive — equipment for easy single-handed sailing. Since then many boatbuilders have sought to emulate the company's designs at a lower cost — “often copied but never perfected,” as Morris puts it. The M-Series yachts are designed for spending a few hours or a weekend on the water in perfect comfort and style, while the Ocean Series is made for longer excursions with more time spent aboard and belowdecks.

Classic materials like mahogany, teak, steel, brass and chrome abound aboard a Morris yacht, giving it a timeless appearance. You also find many high-tech elements like carbon fiber and Kevlar composites for masts and spars. Put in an order for an elegant new M46 and you will be provided with a dedicated project manager, naval architect and an interior designer to carry out your personal vision for the vessel. The layout offers two private cabins with en-suite baths, a spacious main saloon, a full-sized galley and integrated wireless home office, with total accommodations for up to six guests.

Interiors can be completely customized to owner’s specifications using the finest materials and fixtures sourced from around the globe. And you can even learn to sail one in only three days. It might sound improbable, but having sailed the M36 we fully believe it to be true. The starboard electric winch means you can raise the mainsail from the cockpit with the touch of a button, and operating the rest of the equipment is equally simple. Powerful but quiet engines take over when the sails are furled. Every Morris yacht buyer receives three days of private instruction, custom designed to match the requirements of each owner — which is included in the purchase price.

Mr. Morris himself has been known to provide said instruction when he has the time, an indication of his commitment to the company that bears his name and was founded by his father Tom Morris over 40 years ago. As well as newly constructed yachts, Morris also runs a brokerage service for pre-owned vessels, including a few classic craft that are up to Morris standards. There are currently 32 pre-owned yachts listed for sale via the Morris website, ranging in price from $38,000 to $3M. And of course Morris will build you a completely custom yacht should you so desire.

In addition to sales and brokerage, Morris also runs a luxury charter service from their full service marina in Northeast Harbor. While a million-dollar sailboat might not be a practical purchase for everyone, the charter service provides access to a wide range of Morris yachts that are privately owned and therefore impeccably maintained. As an entrée to the Morris Yachts experience, chartering a yacht can be surprisingly affordable and the location provides the perfect means for exploring one of the most beautiful sections of the Maine coast.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


About the same time minimum lot sizes, plumbing codes got beefed up and what you could do or not do around a Maine lake was discussed, hashed out, put on paper, kicked in to law.

Maine’s shoreland zoning administered by the state’s Department of Environmental Protection Agency (DEP), the Land Use Regulation Commission (LURC), and local towns themselves around the waterbodies actually made the process of development around Maine’s lakes, rivers, etc streamlined. Defined, so that inconsistencies and lots of local hub bub, hooplah is lessened. Don’t get me wrong, there is always the guy who back in the 1960’s cleared the rocks 20 feet out in front of the lake cottage he has in Maine with a farm tractor, a back hoe. Creating a giant mud, silt plume and disturbing the shoreline, the natural balace of the vegetation, wildlife along that beach front. Man made and played with. I remember a local cottage owner being spotted from the air by local Maine environmental authorities and he was the first example publically brought to task when returning to the “beach front improvement” on his own, sans permits or permission. His defense that for years he had done this, this and this. Not anymore sailor.

For a time the penalty for over removal within the first 75 and then 100 feet of the shoreline along a Maine waterbody, the waterfront was replanting in more strategic spots, a small fine.

I remember a local real estate buyers on Grand Lake in Danforth Maine saying with a smile, I got rid of the trees obstructing the view and put the same number back in but where I wanted them and only a small fine.

Now shorelines on many lakes have been videoed and local lake association in Maine watch, protect, police the property development around those lakes, ponds, etc. Giving the waterfront property in Maine to your kids, the next generation in as good or better shape or condition is the basis of stewardship. Respect for a lake, and selfishly protecting the value of that Maine waterfront property, the investment.

Expansion of no more than 30% of the original footprint and how to calculate it because a thorn, and subject to lengthy debates on little Maine lake, ponds, rivers, oceanfront, etc. Local code enforcement officers that in a small rural in nature, population state like Maine assumed the helm of many towns on a part time, shared basis. Keeping up with Maine shoreland zoning regulations, changes for a one man or one woman small town office and its selectmen was overwhelming. In many cases these muncipal jobs held on a part time basis. And because of the friction and being the lake police so to speak, the burn out factor to keep track of violations, like whether that new deck is bigger than the one on the old Maine cottage. Or now, or ever did that original camp even have a deck becomes the day to day buzz around these small town offices. 250′ feet back from the waterfrontage is the shoreland zoning extra protection zone in Maine.

I am president of the Drews Lake Property Owners Association, a member of the Maine Congress of Lakes Assocation and enjoy keeping local lakes clean, free of milfoil, protected from soil erosion and silt that chokes fish. If you were a Maine lake, could talk, you would gurgle a reminder that you and your buddies hate lawns. Weed and feed and competition for who’s lawn is the greenest, most golf course like means phosphorous, fertilizer heading in to the lake, causing algae blooms, lots of vegetation and weeds growing out front in the water in places where you never had vegetation before. Ground water run off from your lot is not suppose to race to the lake, picking up silt and debris, causing erosion along the way either. Lakes hate lawns. So do the wildlife that we here first but that will leave, disappear if the Maine waterfront resource is not protected, preserved.


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